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such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get there. african-american voters, 85%. hispanics 66. and those are the fundamentals of the democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. in which of the following closest to coming to think the presi
-creates with their own experiences. the process of mourning, which is not just formal school education, but interactions with her parents about the whole world is a very important part of the development of intelligence. you could do a perfect job of re-creating the neo cortex and i wouldn't do anything useful, just like a newborn is limited in scale without an education. in fact, that's an important paradigm for the a.i., artificial intelligence is to them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neo cortex is as opposed to the blame? >> guest: gets old brain and the neighboring. only mammals have the neo cortex. early mammals emerged over 100 million years ago. the neo cortex is the size of a postage stamp. it's as thin as stamp and basically the outer layer, the new ryan of the brain. it's capable of thinking is hierarchical fashion. >> host: that the part of the brain you are focusing on? >> guest: these early mammals was limited, but enabled them to learn no schools -- new skills. but they were able to adapt. that was not so much of an advantage because the environment to change quickly. it took tho
and in a way that recertified higher education. customized and better. >> one of the themes we've been talking with authors here at freedom test about the moralism of a moralism about capitalism. is there a moral component interview? >> is the subject of the next book coming out at the end of the month -- the end of august. capitalism has moral because it's about getting real world needs another people and it's a free market transaction is a reciprocal exchange. the person provides benefits to the other. george gilder who i saw you interviewing talks about it as giving. each side gets to the other. so capitalism -- basically people who believe in big government via free market transaction is a one-sided transaction that is each side its benefits. it may not be ideal, but there's benefit always in a transaction otherwise would not occur because it's in a free market. no one is forcing you to enter into this exchange and that's why there's benefits to both sides. if european forests, the unilateral transaction is one that takes place between the individual and government. >> was your enthusiasm
or first-time tablet users. for kids this is wonderful with your using it as an educational tool (...) i can see the parents and the doctor's office and the kids are restless. you can take this with you and that is what people love tabletsc13 . >>guest: absolutely and i want to point out that a lot of usround on their cell phones you walk into the world of the 7 in screen it is a whole different experience. i am going to show you the carrousel at all the wonderful things on the tablet.it is clear at point on the phone lines and the air in prime time and this is a busy time of the day. 85 percent of the immediate available tablets are gone already. fternoon on the east coast and the evening on the -- it is now the afternoon on the west coast and evening on the east coast. the best talent in a 7 in. no question. --tablet >>host: and is $40 on first flex pay. >>host: no shipping and handling and you are going to have an extended money back guarantee. treat yourself or someone you love. with the buy this for yourself or as a t, whoever gets this and uses it is not every single hour but pr
to the defense settlement and the objective the nhs budget and the object to the education budget, even though nhs schools are going up, and what exactly would they do? the problem is as was evident from the shadow chancellor's response, they didn't have anything to say on these matters but if they had a credible deficit plan then we would listen to the questions they ask us about the priorities of those plans. >> john stephenson. >> this cools and colleges of 270 million are extremely welcome. schools and colleges such as those in my constituency plans on the runway ready to take off, just in a little additional financial support. will the chancellor help those colleges and schools? >> i'm very happy to look personally at the case my honorable friend makes for his local education facility. these are of course other government departments but we have provided the money for education, for new free schools and academies. and i'm sure that carlyle should be looked at. >> steve reed. >> chancellor aware because of his continuing inadequate level of funding to school building which today's statemen
in the global race by switching from current spending to capital investment in science, roads and education. we offer new support for business and enterprise so they can create the jobs we need. and in everything we do we will show today we are on the side of those who want to work hard and get on. mr. speaker, the office for budget responsibility has today produced its latest economic forecast, and it is a measure of the constitutional achievement that it has taken for granted that our country's forecast is now produced independently of the treasury, free from the political interference of the past. i want to thank robert choate, his fellow members of the budget respondent committee and all their staff for their rigorous approach. one of the advantages of the creation of the abr is that not only do we get independent forecasts, we also get an independent explanation of why the forecasts are as they are. if, for example, lower rates was the result of of the government's fiscal policy, they would say so, but they do not. they say the economy has performed less strongly than expected -- >> [laugh
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
on financial aid. and it would be a tragedy if this country moves in a direction to make education less affordable. so we, as a university, are very dependent and very concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> are you also in the class from parent university? >> i do enjoy teaching. and i take every opportunity to meet with students, to talk to students, and to teach in my spare time. >> what does a provost do and how long were you at princeton? >> i was at princeton for 28 years from the time i got my ph.d. until the time i came to pan and i was on the faculty at princeton and also provost, the chief academic and chief financial officer at princeton, so the proposed works very closely with the president. >> what is the learning curve on being president of the university? >> well, the learning curve is steep for anybody, and it is also very exciting. >> how many students, give us -- >> the university of pennsylvania has 10,000 undergraduates approximately into a dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we run three hospitals. we have a great school of med
education, published poems, journalism, and now this journalistic memoir. how do you -- you're now the most visible member of your generation of the family, of the generation before you, there's only one survivor, a woman not much involved in public life, how do you interpret your inherent? do you see yourself as a leader in some way? do you reflect on what your responsibilities are? how do you interpret your inherent? >> it's bad to think of it that way. it's that thinking that got us here in the first place. the idea that six letters of a last name somehow qualify anyone for leadership is dangerous and served pakistan dangerly, or, rather, it has not served pakistan so i never wanted, actually, for as long as i can remember, i wanted to be a writer, always. that -- or an actress or a swimmer. [laughter] my father was not pleased about the other two choices. i'm doing what i always thought i would be doing, what i always wanted to do, my heros growing up were always journalists, writers, and i think the notion of dynasty is one that has to be repudiated in my sense because we've seen what
with. and in health, education, on and on and on. about 25 things. it's shocking really. .. start with john adams and then over to dan and anna woman ratepayer. [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> this is a similar question from a more pointed direction. you now, i think one of the things the labor movement notices is that it's possible to characterize what's gone on in terms of the living standards, working people in america as great promise of the last generation. if you twist your data a certain way. a lot of our people afford a lot larger tv than in 1970. people don't steal tvs as much as they used to because they're so cheap now. [inaudible] last night are not made in america anymore like they used to be. but in actuality, the things most important is which your book is about trying to capture. the most important in people's lives in terms of family retirement security, health care, access to education have all become much more difficult for working people to obtain. and the quality of life -- the quality of life is great pressure and has been for a long time.
to determine the best education treatment and care for their disabled children. proponents of the treaty will dismiss those concerns as myth. i simply cannot support a treaty that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constantly made for a state interference. if this vote in this treaty were in fact about protecting the rights of americans with disabilities, i might have a different position in the debate would take on a very different tone. this treaty is ultimately not about protecting rights of americans with disabilities because this treaty simply has no enforcement mechanism to protect those rights, the rights of disabled americans including veterans who may travel the country such as china or russia or mali or any other country that may choose to adopt this treaty. if the senate desires to protect rights of disabled americans who travel abroad, the senate would do better to encourage other nations to model their own reforms, their own internal legal structures after the americans with disabilities act, which 20 years after its passage still send a message
with the education of little kids teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions for this to work, and it can't happen overnight. so as i said, part of the problem is they've created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> you expressed some pessimism or realism about what's likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops that'll be back, essentially, to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that which is islamist, which is semi-democratic but with the emphasis on the semi and, of course, is nuclear armed? >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. and i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them, there will be circumstances where some nuance and potential compromise is required, then you approach all of these problems that way. if you have very good intell
of chicago. that's how it happened. find those 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of a lot of these islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is a response to the corruption of these you sponsored regimes. i would say that in the case of gaza which you mentioned, rob, that was a very series component. any thoughts how to combat that or includes this in the right direction? >> for the record i'm against corruption. [laughter] , good, good, good. >> wanted to clear that up. yes, look. it goes back to the point i thought it made in my remarks that islamists didn't win and non-islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or the divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services. they lose by being so corrupt. they lose by being ossified. they lose, and i islamists are there like they been for eight years to take advantage of whatever opportunity, violence or through nonviolence. we didn't discuss their relationship with
-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of american health care reform including a 2001 book entitled the wages of sickness, the politics of health insurance, in progress of america at the university of north carolina. in her talk today she is going to speak about her latest book, the book titled is "health care for some". i have the feeling it is relevant to our times. the talk is entitled health care for all, women, activism and women's right to health. this is a history -- her book rather and her talk today will be partly, a history of rights and rationing in the united states from the great depression to the present, and the book just came out by the university of chicago pres
have been trying to do education. education doesn't work to get people to follow the speed limits. what works is when somebody sees a camera or an officer on the side of the road and then everybody is compliant. lean health care have a lot of room to increase accountability and quite frankly i think it'll really restore the trust that has been broken with the general public. >> host: so let's go back to the culture question again. i was riveted when i was reading the book about your account when you are a net room and everybody raised their hands. in fact as you describe it, you were -- to raise your hand. there was a senior position next to you who looked at usaid really, you don't know anyone? but what about the culture do you think has led us to this point where we actually said -- where we no harm is occurring or we have a sense of it that we have gotten to this point where people are afraid to speak up and afraid to criticize their peers or the institution? you make a point a number of times in the book that, and actually in your opening chapter, where you talk about the fact that
, fundamental rights of parents to direct the education and the upbringing of their child with h special needs. this could result in forcibly transferring a disabled child from the home to government-run schools if these unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats deem it necessary, even if the senate puts reservations into this treaty." i ask that this letter -- i have two letters i'd ask that would be made a part of the record at this point. that is one of the other once coming from the concerned women of america. i ask that they be made a part of the record at this point in the journal. ferraro ithe presiding officer:s there objection? without objection. mr. inhofe: i have been an advocate of human rights around the world, ensuring that the world is accessible to those with disabilities. however, i do not support the cumbersome regulations and potentially overzealous international organizations with anti-american biases that inch - that infringe upon american society. you know, if we had not passed what i consider to be the gold standard of the disabled world when we passed -- and i do remember at
is education, and how to make higher education cheaper. how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing that you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> well, i don't think there's a number one thing, but a number of number one things, and we have to do them all. as a 21st century student, doesn't look like it. it's not just an 18-year-old that graduated high school. that still continues to be a significant part of the folks that are going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school to get a degree. that was my sister's experience. it's also the 25-year-old after ten years after being out of high school is stuck in service jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves with new skills. the great news is that technology advances are going to not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but will make it, you know, much more accessible, and with we have to ensure our student aid programs are not in the way of it. right now, we have a student aid program, the pelle grants or the loan programs, they
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
a college education in the 1920s was generally thought to these pursuing that for her own personal betterment, and not for the purpose of having a career. it was to become a better wife, better homemaker, a better mother in the future. that was the object of post-secondary education, primarily. women could go into the teaching profession so carson certainly could have been a teacher and she could have taught biology or writing in the future. that would have been a career avenue that was open to her. science was also more open to women than other disciplines where. the marine biological laboratory was a place where a lot of dominant women scientists studied and one of carson's predecessors at the mbl was another person that one on two actually become a writer, gertrude stein spent a couple of summers at the mbl which i find interesting. carson's prospects would have been circumscribed by the fact that she was a woman. i was talking earlier with someone about her role at the fish and wildlife service and whether there was something that was gender oriented about the fact the she was
for the federal government in education. if we want one, we need to pass an amendment to the constitution to do it. now, he was for changing the constitution to get a role for education. but he said how is it that we have all these teacher training programs run by the federal government costing billion dollars a year run out of washington to train teachers who are actually a local and community and state responsibility? how'd we get there? and, oh, by the way, does anybody know if they're actually improving teacher training? actually improving the skills of our teachers? so there's really two questions. one is what's the constitutional role of the federal government in that and, number two, if there's a legitimate role -- or even if there isn't, you're spending the money -- shouldn't you know, shouldn't when we pass this say here's the metrics which we're going to use to measure whether or not a teacher's effective or whether the teacher training programs are effective? >> host: this month on our booktv "in depth" program, senator tom coburn, who is also a medical doctor and an author. he wrote "t
. and that think it's a venture but education. if greece serious about doing education will have to happen or as enough effort that there would have been dozens of discussions going on in the meetings afterwards . i don't think there is any magical language or words that we can use, although we have to struggle with what it is. we do have to think about how we organize ourselves to take on this incredibly powerful system that really does work just by hammer you over the head, through markets, and it works through liberal democracy. empire doesn't just work. it's not just when america goes into iraq. >> liberal democracy. [inaudible] and have, you know. [inaudible] >> i would say that with -- within the need to understand is how capitalism functions as a system. and the extent to which the state as we now have it is, in fact, a state. it is very poor in the weight is structured in every policy that is given to it as a reform, those reforms are structured in ways so as to reproduce capitalist social relations. so as not just a matter of democratizing and speaking of the need to turn bank
they can.ll especially to cancel with the l problems. the problems ofeove environment, education and i feel new generation since the earthquake that is more committed to doing that to helping out making sure haiti has a future as a, youat know, lays out clearly in the future that it should have a future. that deserves. >> who is sweet mickey? >> sweet mickey is the nickname of our president whot president of haiti. >> how is he doing? right now,u know, tomorrow, -- tomorrow is an important anniversary in haiti. the anniversary of the battle which was a very crucial battle and haitian independence.ba and, you know, there have been some demonstrations of again this potential demonstrations throughout haiti because of theo problems or urge gent. there's urgent problems and people are seeking solutions from him. >> and unfortunately we're outo of time with edwidge danticat.. "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" is the most recent an thotion to which she contributed. "brother i'm dying" is the awari winning book.e edwidge danticat thank you for joins
on many of those shows. we have a doctor on tape to recommend this. >> as a harvard and yale educated physician, one of the things that makes me very comfortable talking about no! no! is all the research and clinicial trials that show that it really does work. and that is why i feel confident recommending it to my patients. >>host: think about that a doctor recommending this to her patients. think about the other methods, your lazer, which by the way is not effective for every type of skin, the waxing, i do not like to do that because it is painful prevent >>guest: or the no! no!. is the least expensive one with a end in sight. one of the most effective hair removal methods out there. this every time we go to the united kingdom. it is because it is effective on all skin types. everybody can use this, she is a woman of color. maybe they are not able to use laser. light hair, gray hair, peach fuzz. no! no! will work on all of them. it is thermodynamic technology. they have all cut this back for us. --done+ this for us.it is treating the hair. this is really different we have used th
right hon. friend do everything he can to insure that education, health and social services work together to jointly commissioned services that will make sure the much welcome reforms in the children and families bill will be workable on the globe? >> my hon. friend makes a very important point. we do need to get away from the idea of government or even local government operating in sinos with different budgets in different departments not working together. i know representatives lyndon as he does, takes huge steps bringing agencies together and working together in the area of problem families and commend them for the work they do. >> whatever announcements the chancellor makes on pension taxes, and when the government came to power, $1.6 billion, the chancellor gives the sheet? >> we inherited a plan to raise four billion pounds from the wealthiest people in terms of taxes and raise that four billion pounds and my right hon. friend will make further announcements in a moment. >> robert smith. >> the northeast of scotland makes a major contribution to the u.k. economy through the
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
the possibility of democrats, who were doing things based on conservative ideas in the area of education, welfare, medicaid and so forth, and take all of that and elevate it and publicize it. his background, really, is in marketing. he ran a marketing company before politics, and he admits quite frankly that in the last election the conservative movement really didn't do an adequate job of explaning its ideas contributing to the losses nay took in the last election. >> senator demint had a great relationship with the tea party groups. what's that mean for the groups with the senator moving to ahead heritage? >> i think it means, bill, that he may try to take them to the next level. no one would dispute, i don't think, that the tea party has, schal we say, communication problems, and if their basic idea was to reduce the level of public spend k and in the states, i think that using the force of the analysis that senator demint and analysts at harming have at their di poe sal is there is the pos protect of the conservative movement becoming more understanding to the largely public. what can you tal
d from the university of chicago. that's how it happened. it was like 10 guys. i miss 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you know you mentioned the justice component of a lot of islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is response to the corruption of these u.s. sponsored regimes and in the case of gaza, which he mentioned was a very serious component. any thoughts on how to combat that were placed in the right direction? >> for the record, i am against corruption. i just wanted to clear that up. yes, look, it goes back to the point i thought i made in my remarks that islamists didn't win. i'm not islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose they screwing up the delivery of services. in this by being so corrupt. they lose and islamists are there like they've been for 80 years, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity through violence or nonviolence. we didn't even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, wh
artwork and writing in particular, but we have educate people to become more descript -- to become more effective judges of what makes something good. and people read. people buy books. it's a very book-loving community. and i think the writes' institute has done a lot to enhance that. even on some level create the environment in which people could explore literature especially. i think that there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite rich, and we are in the feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation is the write's institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers formed sort of an -- toward colombia where a lot of new york city writers have weekend holmes all the way up to saratoga and beyond. we have places like the writers' colony there. the writers' groups in hudson, new york. east to west and western massachusetts, and west to syracuse. that's the audience sort of circumference that we work with. so when you go back, and you find a g
say the american taxpayer helps subsidize their education because many of them receive world-class training at our public and private colleges and universities, and then reluctantly return home to pursue their careers because they can't get a visa or can't get a green card here in america. we are cultivating human capital and then sending those individuals back home. now, this is an area where there is broad, broad support. my colleague, senator moran, recently wrote a letter, had a "dear colleague" letter which points out that roughly -- well, he cites in the letter that more than three-quarters of voters support a stem-type visa. he quotes in this letter, dated july 20, 2012, "87% of democrats polled, 72% of republicans polled and 65% of independents support the creation of a stem visa." and, of course, if you think about it, it's just common sense. why in the world would we want to subsidize the education of these students from other countries, train them in these highly specialized and highly desirable fields and then simply send them home? i've introduced legislation ove
of it is of their own making. you cannot start with the education of the kids, teaching them to aid israel and everything it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions . it can't happen overnight. so does the central part of the problem is they created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of reasonable deal. >> expressed some pessimism or realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. there will be back, a senseless, to where it was before september 11th. what happens in pakistan after that? democratic, emphasis on semi. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them there will be circumstances for some nuance and potential compromise has required, then you approached all of these problems the way. you have very good intelligence. you can understand what is going on with in
entertainment and education universal will hit the internet but on the remote and you will see for a second once i do that it will load up all of the different opportunities, you go to vud orvudu app stores , [reading] 3 >>guest: different opportunities, and most of what you are seeing here is free. your family to enjoy television know what a television has been for you.incredible motivational speakers. delicious to become a wonderful recipes for you and let this, most of this is absolutely and that is all part the vuduis you will be able to the stream high- definition movies with dolby digital surround sound directly to your television and you are paint a been took charge but it is available to built into the television and with all of the extra opportunity you will not have to have the premium cable subscriptions to happen in the past. and we did mention the fact that this is a 3d capable television. get done this is television come on 3d get out of the way. it is so lifelike, real, realistic, and this is like being in the movie theater and joined 3d. jim self that screen. this is 8 tb that
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and riding in particular but educated people and become more discriminating, become more effective judges of what makes something good. people buy books, this is a book loving community and the institute has done all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further eas
missiles. >> they were in israel. >> they were in israel. >> go back to your education, then. where did you go to college? >> i did a b.a./m.a. of middle eastern history at columbia college. an m.a. and b.a.in middle eastern at princeton. >> israeli and american citizen? >> i am. >> why due end up in the 1982 war in lebanon? >> i always wanted to move to israel. i saw my future in israel. i wanted to raise my family in israel. in 1973, at the end of the 1973 war which i would have missed had i been living in israel, i determined i wasn't going to move just then. i was going to do my b.a. first. i did my b.a. which turned out as an m.a. i worked as an advisor to the israeli administration to the u.n. arafat speaking for the general assembly. very tumultuous period. i moved to israel and tried for this unit in the army. the tryouts are rather rigorous. i did 17 months of basic training. and got out just prior to the lebanon war. but in israel, we have -- you serve for a long period your regular serve and do reserve service to the age of 52. now i have a son in the army who is 19. and in a ver
, rats with fresh eyes. i've been amazed, enlightened, educated and contained by robert sullivan's books, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in
any formal education. he was impoverished, really hard scrabble childhood. his family moved around a lot. once he was on his own he moved around a lot. he was a craftsman, kind of a furniture maker and painter. never got ahead, and then his wife entirely changed. once he converted to mormonism when he was a little bit more than 30 years old. >> how did that happen? how did he meet joseph smith, et cetera? >> he first met the book of mormons. missionaries brought it shortly after is published in 1830, some of his family members read it. he later said he read it and he it and he spent a long time thinking about it. he didn't jump on board right away. he was a little bit skeptical, a little uncertain, and he spent a couple years considering the claims of this new bible, this new work of scripture. then he encountered a group of traveling mormon elders, or missionaries, and he saw them speak in tongues. something he hadn't encountered i think to the point in his life, and he took that as a clear sign of god's power, that god's power was with this new church. shortly after that, he is b
tool for relators. for teachers and educational purposes. i am going to stop this over here and it will look like the clouds are rolling into your living room. >>guest: look how big this guy is. e sky is. >>host: is available in white and what a great look for a guy or a girl? in your bathroom and you kenyas and as a music system and playback your favorite disc. >>guest: this isnts and the most popular size.i love these independent colors the juice cannot get elsewhere. it is an all media player and i love how streamline in this is about 2 in. slam. it has anut so you can plug into a different tv. any tv in to any tv. eve in the hotel room. -- even >>guest: we include the splitter for you as well or you can plug it right in here. dolby digital's stereo sound and is still only 2 lbs.. >>host: gift to show and you love him but maybe you are on a budget. this will cost you a dollar a day if you want to use flex payment options. if you try to figure out what is great for your granddaughter or daughter for the holidays maybe you feel other touch with the world of electroni
to keep going forward to look to the future as an army. one of those is just as such a super educated, well trained, junior later echelon now that is capable of doing so much more. we can't lose that. so we have to educate them on how to deploy that. the provincial reconstruction team, the usaid, ngos, they ngos, they're working the same battle states, operational lines that we are with the afghan national cicada force. so you have to train your task force to kind of shift your force. human and physical geography and all the baggage that comes with it. and so that was, that was a necessary step we had to take the and every battalion like mine or brigade is doing the same thing. there's a lot of differences between iraq and afghanistan. i was fortunate to have served in both countries and go back to afghanistan against on your a little bit. you asked the question what is no slack. again, that ethos describes whose those soldiers are and to embrace that mission, understands what has to happen, and knowing they're going to try to do some good. talk about at a lot of iraq veterans, people
for the republican party in one of the things he taught about is education and how to make higher education cheaper, how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> i don't think there's a number one thing. you've got to do them all. the biggest obstacle we face as a 21st century student doesn't look like a 21st century student. send each other graduated high school. it's a significant part of the folks going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. does my sister's experience. it's a 25-year-old who after 10 years has been stuck in the service area jobs and decides they want to empower themselves with skills. the great thing is technological advances will not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but are going to make it much more accessible. we have to make sure student aid programs don't stand in the way of it. let me give you an example. right now what we have are the pell grant for the loan programs. the accredited institution. ditto
constituents or colleagues, he striving strio educate with facts, weaved, andh facts, with evidence, and with the truth. none of us has ever heard jon try to win an argument by belittling or berating an opponent. it is simply not in his characteristic to do so. mr. president, it has been said that a politician thinks of the next election a statesman of the next generation. this statesman of arizona expresses his philosophy of government and the obligation of government leaders this way: quote "we owe future generations the chance to live their dreams, to be successful, and, most important, to achieve true happiness by their own efforts." end quote. senator jon kyl's commitment to the security of our nation, to fiscal responsibility, and to helping those in need have earned him a reputation that is worthy of his characteristic. the people of arizona and america are grateful for his service, and i am thankful for his guidance over the years and for his friendship. we wish him all the best to come in the years before him. mr. president, there is one more tribute that i'd like to give t
services social workers and other relationship that allows them to do with this tough issues in an educated way and resources to help. i think that is where we look at our responsibility is to help them navigate that decision. it's a personal decision and a hard decision about that decision be the family members and provider. we are believers that hospice, especially in circumstances that is not promising is the right way to do it. so you take it from a cost discussion to quality-of-life discussion. when you make the quality-of-life discussion, the cost discussion will bear out there. >> if i understand your point, it is that integrated care is what is going to lead to efficiencies to eliminate waste and bring down cost of the entire health care system. >> you probably just answer the question you're trying to ask me 50 different times. >> but devil is in the details. who's going to answer these questions to better care is provided or not? in less than someone ago that ensure insurance come in as we had to go to a primary care doctor to get permission to go to a specialist. is it the primar
into it growing so quickly and having more success i believe educating the public, in bringing more people in than my tours -- my hundreds of different presentations ever did. it's exactly what brings people in. instead of choosing one solution over another. i don't think it's at all alienating. on the contrary. it's working. pushing the envelope. i would also say that it is -- these social movements that change the international consensus, the international consensus is not like a ready-made box that has always been there. it's something that changes over time and that's what we're part of doing. and the last thing i would say in terms of the victory thing exaggerated. first of all, as i said in my opening comments, bds is a lot about education, and like i said, i believe we have achieved a lot with bds in that way. and galvanizing people, et cetera. to say it hasn't worked, look at israeli newspapers. this movement is perceived as more challenging to the status quo than any diplomatic lip service by obama or un resolutions or anything ever did. we see it now mentioned regularly in the "new york
's recommendations to promote job creation and economic development, education, health care, clean energy and to improve security. april. >> what are your thoughts about elijah cummings who has to be good friends at the president saying that no deal [inaudible] >> well come i didn't see the specific comments. the president has principles here he intends to stick to, which is that he will not sign an extension of the bush era tax cuts for the top 2%. full stop, he will not sign a bill that extends those tax rates for the top 2%. we can't afford it. it's not a wise economic policy. it's not wise fiscal policy and it would defeat the principle of balance he has embraced so clearly throughout these negotiations. he is fully committed to extending tax cuts for the vast majority of the american people. 90% any wishes the house of representatives would pass the bill tomorrow and he would sign it right away. that is a principle he takes in today's. i don't want to forecast in a pessimistic way because i believe in the president and secretary geithener least we can achieve a compromise here. what
with fresh eyes. i have been amazed, enlightened, educated, entertained. none more so than my american revolution. until i read his book, i thought i was reasonably conversant for college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. the war we all know, but mostly in massachusetts, virginia, and the carolinas. war in which the high road, no army barely survived an epic the punishing winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other pump demolishes these myths and gives us an award centered around morristown new jersey and the watch on mountain. yes, you heard me right. i wore a% of which was fought on a terrain visible from the top of the empire state building. truth be told, however, as well as admiration, i have a grievance upon with both -- we're both irish and writers so we have to have grievances. i have been heard and deeply disappointed and a personal level by juan ponce books. five years ago in the fall of 2007i reviewed how not to get rich. i praised it as a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective 70 in whi
education in how to reform programs be the number one thing you would do, you can do as a freshman minority speakers i don't think there's a number one thing. there's a number of things. we got to get them all. the biggest obstacle we face in the 21st century doesn't look like the 21st century. not just in a jewel to graduate high school. still continues to be a significant part of folks that are going into college but it's also the 38 year old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. that was my sister. it's also the 25 year old that's after 10 years of being out of high school has been stuck in a service area jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind of skill acquisition but are going to make it much more accessible. we have to make sure it is her student aid programs don't stand in whether. let me give you an example. right now what we have is student aid like pell aid like pell grants or the loan programs, they have credit institutions. they don't have cr
thick dignities and education and the fact that there are young people alive to watch football is largely because of the people of the united states. that's kind of her difference. we've chosen a path of investment, human capital. it pays off in the long term rather than the immediacy of a football stadium. we've seen over the past several years 30 plus% decline in hiv/aids. that's not exclusively in the united states feared where the largest contributor to the end is something we should be proud of. it's huge that people in africa have that. >> last weekon monday or senator kirsten gillibrand delivered testimony on the hill and told stories of families who lost children to hurricane cindy. those hit hardest by the film testified by the senate environment and public works committee. new york, new jersey, rhode island, maryland and delaware lawmakers talked about the impact in the ongoing recovery efforts. this is two hours and 30 minutes. >> we are here today to receive testimony from members of congress. representatives and senators to represent communities that were the most
that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is not okay to put people in cells, chained to cells, whose only crime is that they are disabled. you would think we would want to be part of that effort. we've done that in this country. we've done wonderful things. and yet some fear, some unfounded fear that the united nations is going to come in with a black helicopter or something, i don't know what, and say you can't home school your kids. absolutely -- look, the americans with disabilities act, we've had it for 22 years. did it stop home schooling? of course not. did it lead to more abortions? of course not. mr. president, after this vote vote, after it was defeated, i walked out into the reception room, the senate reception room. there were a throng, a number of people that in the disability community, they were crushed. just crushed. they could not understand this. how could it be? ever
beencountry with limited resources, --girls do not get an education. you can see the women are doing they are in their 30's or '40's protect these women are elite beaters. bring the work back to katmandu. . and they wanted me to wish you ec's and greetings. >>host: they blast that jewelry, the blast osprey it is a true sisterhood. >>host: it is not a charity case we love this jewelry. the red this final call, the blue. there is a lot of beaded jewelry out there this is not what you find for $50 per and the bead work looks like juleswels it is not just one shade of blue. back at >>guest: therefore shades of each of the colors you have your silver gold beads. you're really going to sparkle. you want to piece of jewelry that price is important you can deny that. when your needs are taking care of, take some pleasure in knowing you are supporting the traditional beaders. for the first time in their life they have financial freedom. >>host: for many years you could not get jewelry at of this part of the world. >>host: is the most beautiful rich plumber. it looks like diamonds are
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